Boeing gets green light for 737 Max to resume US flights

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Boeing Corporation Inc (NYSE::BA.) is to be allowed to fly its 737-Max jet again after 18 months of investigations and recriminations following two fatal crashes.


The US Federal Aviation Administration gave its permission subject to software changes and agreement on new training schedules for pilots.


US carriers are expected to start commercial flights at the end of the year led first by American Airlines with United and Southwest set to follow in 2021.


European airlines will have to wait until regulators give their own approval but a consultation paper is expected shortly that will pave the way for airlines to resume flights in 2021.


That should give a boost to Ryanair PLC (LON:RYA), which prior to the grounding had been expected to replace most of its fleet with 737 Max-200s and has remained committed to the aeroplane even with its problems.


In an update two weeks ago, Ryanair said it expected to take control of its first Max-200 early in 2001 and to have thirty in service by peak summer.


Their carrier is still in talks with Boeing on compensation for the delays caused by the aircraft’s grounding.


The FAA has been accused of being too close to Boeing during the recent investigations but administrator Steve Dickson told Reuters that it had done ‘everything humanly possible’ to make sure that could be no further crashes of this type.


Boeing is being sued by relatives of the people killed in Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 and the Lion Air flight that crashed in Indonesia six months earlier.


Problems with the stall-prevention software were blamed for both incidents and all aircraft built or parked during the grounding period will have to be checked and have their software upgraded individually before being allowed to fly said the FAA.


Shares in Boeing rose 2% to US$212.61.

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